Long time ago in Korea, there was a 17 years old girl who was so pretty that everyone wanted to marry her. However, the only thing that did not satisfy her family was poverty. She had two older brothers who were grown ups. Those bothers were so selfish that they decided to give her away in marriage to a wealthy old man, so that they didn’t starve. But She neither complained about it nor blamed her brothers for it. Furthermore, she said to her parents, “I’m not sad but glad. You have raised me and now I’m paying back my debt to you.” The Koreans have thought that one should respect parents and thank parents for raising oneself. Fortunately her husband, who was twenty year older than her, loved her very much. They led a happy and privileged life and had kids, two sons and four daughters.
However, it was Korean War that took away her husband from her. Her husband was bombed on their way to flee to the southern part of Korea that was far from battle fields. Suddenly she had to take all responsibility for her kids. To make things worse, she lost almost everything in bombing. She realized that she became poor again and had to do something to feed her kids, two sons and four daughters. She said to herself over and over, “I’ll let never my kids starved.” She started a business in Busan. Actually it’s not a business but a kind of street vendor. She sold everything to make money from a match to food. Despite her effort, her family lived from mouth to mouth, wearing ragged clothes. But she sent her kids to school and used to say, “You have to learn though you can’t eat.” “Mom, I want to earn money. I can, please,” her eldest daughter would tell her, “No, you can’t. I don’t want you to make money. If you want to please me, go to school and study.” She was typical of Korean mom who put children’s education before anything else.

After the war, she and her kids went back to Seoul. Her house was destroyed but her husband’s lands were still there. She realized it was land that even war couldn’t take away from her. She started a factory to make matches. For years, the business was good but since the electricity and modern heating system were introduced to Korea, it did not work well. Many match factories were out of business and owners of the factories were bankrupted. She was one of them. She started a factory to make game cards but it also failed because new games were coming from America. Koreans were attracted to new western games. Now she had nothing left but the land which her late husband had owned. She realized it was land that even war couldn’t take from her. She decided to deal in real estates. She sold her husband’s lands and bought the lands that were supposed to be developed. This time everything went so well and the lands she bought actually got developed and the price of the land dramatically increased. With the profit she made, she bought the shopping quarters in Seoul, a mountain in countryside, and so on. However, about half of her lands got confiscated to government by the president in dictatorship. Since the she thought that life was unfair and too harsh for her, she had an agenda to leave Korea. With the rest of her money she went to America to provide a better education to their kids. And the grown up kids become famous. Though the woman lost her husband, she educated her kids and thought of ways to survive in harsh Korea.

Peer Response – 1st read-through: Andy I

1. On the level of story-telling: if you were the King (or the aliens), would you allow this story-teller to live another day? If no,why not?
Yes it was a good story that showed alot of culture and history.

2. Think of plot—is it original? (If an adaptation, is it creative or interesting to you?)

As far as I can tell the plot was original.

3. Think about conflict. Does the story have a natural conflict? Are there complications that add enough suspense, tension, or interest? Is there a climax that satisfies you? Is the resolution satisfying? What could be added or changed? The conflict is the hardships of this womens life.

4. Think of characterization—are the characters realistic? Individual? Do we get a good sense of character from many of these: description, dialogue, narrator's opinion, discussion from other characters, the character’s own actions? The character is realistic because of the view of the story.

5. Think of word choice, imagery, and details. Do they help you see and hear and experience the story? Do any word choices need changing? The story isn't set up to be descriptive.

6. On the level of "culture"--what do you think this writer is trying to reveal about the culture he/she lives in? Summarize what this story tells/shows about its culture in a sentence or two.

The writer shows the difficulties of living in a post war society.

7. Does this revelation of culture possess much insight or show you something unique? Do you get a picture of cultural practices? Of gender roles, love relationships, family roles, habits, religious practices, beliefs, food, social expectations, etc.? Should anything be thrown out? Added?

Its a new view on that side of the Korean War.

8. What areas of the story need the most improvement?

There was nothing I noticed that needed changing.

9. Summarize the theme of the story in a sentence or two. Don't just summarize the story, or say what its topic is--that's not theme. "Theme" is what the story reveals about the topic. So put your theme statement in this sort of pattern: "This story reveals that (topic) is (message about the topic)." Do your best here. You'll show the writer what his/her story DOES say, as opposed to what the writer WANTS it to say.

The theme of this story are perseverence and patience will get you through.

Peer Response – 1st read-through: Brian l

1. On the level of story-telling: if you were the King (or the aliens), would you allow this story-teller to live another day? If no,why not?
Yes i would. it has a good plot and a good complication.
2. Think of plot—is it original? (If an adaptation, is it creative or interesting to you?)
Yes. it is very origanal. It is very creative.


3. Think about conflict. Does the story have a natural conflict? Are there complications that add enough suspense, tension, or interest? Is there a climax that satisfies you? Is the resolution satisfying? What could be added or changed?
Yes there is a pretty strong conflict. it is pretty intresting. Could be a better climax. A very good resloutin at the end.
4. Think of characterization—are the characters realistic? Individual? Do we get a good sense of character from many of these: description, dialogue, narrator's opinion, discussion from other characters, the character’s own actions?
You get a pretty good sence of the man girl, some other carictors could be discribed better.
5. Think of word choice, imagery, and details. Do they help you see and hear and experience the story? Do any word choices need changing?
there choice was pretty good. it did discribe the story and the carictors pretty well.
6. On the level of "culture"--what do you think this writer is trying to reveal about the culture he/she lives in? Summarize what this story tells/shows about its culture in a sentence or two.
Umm im not sure.,\\\
7. Does this revelation of culture possess much insight or show you something unique? Do you get a picture of cultural practices? Of gender roles, love relationships, family roles, habits, religious practices, beliefs, food, social expectations, etc.? Should anything be thrown out? Added?
A littel bit but not much
8. What areas of the story need the most improvement?
The culter bit
9. Summarize the theme of the story in a sentence or two. Don't just summarize the story, or say what its topic is--that's not theme. "Theme" is what the story reveals about the topic. So put your theme statement in this sort of pattern: "This story reveals that (topic) is (message about the topic)." Do your best here. You'll show the writer what his/her story DOES say, as opposed to what the writer WANTS it to say.
The story was about a girl that was sold out of her marige for money and then her husband dies.